Check out Little Shop of Physics in Action at the Ram Welcome Street Fair as we welcome new freshmen to CSU!

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The Little Shop of Physics kicked off the tour with our annual tradition of setting up some of our favorite hands-on science experiments at the Kids Music Adventure, part of Bohemian Nights at New West Fest.

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This week, we have a special video from our visiting science teacher Chris Chiaverina. Chris shows us how a microphone works and how to build “Slinky Sounds”, an awesome little experiment that makes some sci-fi sound effects!

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This week, Rachel shows us how to make a vortex canon. This simple device shoots rings of air, and it can be made any size from tiny to gigantic!

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Check out this video by Beau Rainey about the life of Little Shop of Physics interns.

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The Little Shop of Physics Open House takes place every year on the last Saturday of February at the CSU Lory Student Center. This free public event always draws a crowd, and this year is was no exception. Over the course of the day, approximately 10,000 people came to do science with us!

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The week Rachel shows us this awesome experiment using a wireless baby monitor and a microwave oven along with some bottles of water.

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During the first week of October, LSOP visited Fort Washakie School on the Wind River Reservation. All 500 students got to spend 45 minutes exploring our 100+ hands-on science experiments.

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Eva has an egg and a bottle. The egg will not fit in the mouth of the bottle. She uses two different methods to get atmospheric pressure to push the egg into the bottle. The first method uses hot water, some of which evaporates. The water vapor displaces the air inside of the bottle. When the bottle is cooled, the vapor condenses into a liquid, which decreases the pressure inside of the bottle. The second method is similar, but uses a small fire to heat the air inside of the bottle, causing the air to expand. When the flame goes out, the air cools, lowering the pressure on the inside of the bottle.

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Continuing on our theme of atmospheric pressure, this week we experiment on increasing and decreasing pressure, and how it affects the air trapped inside of marshmallows.

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