The week Rachel shows us this awesome experiment using a wireless baby monitor and a microwave oven along with some bottles of water.

Read/comment on full post

What happens when you blow a trumpet through a bubble? You’ve heard of an optical illusion—how about an auditory illusion? The resources on this page answer these questions and more!

Read/comment on full post

The Little Shop of Physics crew spent the first two weeks of 2018 doing what we love: sharing fun, hands-on science education, making new friends, having epic adventures, and trying not to get our solar hot air balloons stuck in acacia trees. Little Shop teamed up with B2Gold for a road trip to Namibia over CSU’s winter break, and we came back with lots of ideas and some great stories to share with you!

Read/comment on full post

During the first week of October, LSOP visited Fort Washakie School on the Wind River Reservation. All 500 students got to spend 45 minutes exploring our 100+ hands-on science experiments.

Read/comment on full post

Eva has an egg and a bottle. The egg will not fit in the mouth of the bottle. She uses two different methods to get atmospheric pressure to push the egg into the bottle. The first method uses hot water, some of which evaporates. The water vapor displaces the air inside of the bottle. When the bottle is cooled, the vapor condenses into a liquid, which decreases the pressure inside of the bottle. The second method is similar, but uses a small fire to heat the air inside of the bottle, causing the air to expand. When the flame goes out, the air cools, lowering the pressure on the inside of the bottle.

Read/comment on full post

As part of the Great American Eclipse, the Little Shop of Physics along with ESMEI handed out 50,000 pairs of glasses in order for folks to safely view the sun. The majority of these glasses were provided free of charge to K-12 and college students, and the remainder were given away. $5,000 in donations were collected for Robert’s Orphanage in Uganda.

Read/comment on full post

Continuing on our theme of atmospheric pressure, this week we experiment on increasing and decreasing pressure, and how it affects the air trapped inside of marshmallows.

Read/comment on full post

Last week, we showed you how atmospheric pressure can be used to give a giant “bear hug”. This week, we use atmospheric pressure to crush a metal can.

Read/comment on full post

A plastic bag is connected to a vacuum pump. Initially the air inside the bag pushes out with the same force as the air outside of the bag pushing in. However, when the air is pumped out of the bag there is nothing to counteract the atmosphere squeezing the bag against the bear.

Read/comment on full post

Last time we saw that we can separate mixtures by using size and magnetism. This time we use density to separate a mixture. This process is used to separate different types of plastics so that they can be recycled.

Read/comment on full post